Sing for Joy

Welcome

Carol on Midweek

Listen to Carol on Midweek (BBC Radio Four) with Libby Purves. First broadcast on 18th February 2015.


Half Moon presents: Henry's Heroes

Carol will be appearing in this benefit in aid of the elegant and versatile Irish guitarist, Henry McCullough.

With Paul Carrack, Nick Lowe, Andy Fairweather - Low, Tim Hinkley, Tony O'Malley, Suggs and Graham Parker.

Tues, 17th March at the Half Moon, Putney. Sold Out.


Preview/Interview: The Singer's Tale

London Jazz News, 13th February 2015

Carol Grimes was one of the very first performers to appear at St James Studio (preview from 2012). In this new interview with Sebastian, she talked about the first outings of her new autobiographical project “The Singer's Tale,” for which she will return to St James Studio with performances on Feb 9th and 26th 2015.

LondonJazz News: What does the show consist of?

Carol Grimes: Songs, little beat poetry, it's a tale interlaced with songs, a lot of them written by Dorian Ford and myself. It's in two halves with an interval. Maggie Ford is directing. Neville Malcolm is on bass, Winston Clifford drums, Annie Whitehead trombone and Dorian Ford piano.

LJN: And the title?

CG: I nicked it from Chaucer – he never wrote a tale about a singer, but he travelled through South East London, knew it, trod the same paths I trod.

Read full article here

Review: The Singer's Tale

St James Studio, 9th February 2015

Large slices of British jazz history are disappearing. The music itself is documented, but the accounts of how it was made and the world for which it was performed are fading because they exist only in the frailest of formats – memory. So when an event like Carol Grimes’ The Singer’s Tale comes along, it forms an invaluable document.

For anyone who lived through the period from the early 60s on the London jazz scene, it will recall events, venues and people long gone, but which form ldquo;names to conjure with”, summoning up memories and recreating events and feelings with a that power goes way beyond nostalgia into reliving. For anyone who didn’t live through it, here is an account of the life of a talented but uneducated woman and mother who did not fit easily into musical categories. Documents on women in British Jazz and Rock – and of their treatment by the almost exclusively male scenes where they were often treated as props rather than musicians – are rare, and this sometimes harrowing, sometimes hilarious look at life is probably unique.

Read full article here

The Singers Tale: Carol Grimes - the “Edith Piaf” of British music

By Sebastian Taylor, Camden Review, 5th February 2015

www.camdenreview.com

Carol Grimes, the “Edith Piaf” of British music, is singing about her extraordinary life in The Singer’s Tale at St James Theatre’s studio next Monday evening.

Part dramatisation of her life story, part jazz gig, she’s singing with her collaborator/pianist Dorian Ford, fabulous trombonist Annie Whitehead, bass player “Level-Neville” Malcolm and leading drummer Winston Clifford.

In the prologue to his Canterbury Tales, Geoffrey Chaucer wrote: He could sing songs make and well endite.

“Well, Chaucer didn‘t get round to recounting a Singer‘s Tale – so here‘s mine,” she says.

Songs, stories and anecdotes in her Singer‘s Tale take the audience through her life from street busker to Ronnie Scott‘s; from Notting Hill to Nashville; from Memphis to San Francisco; and from Hackney to Texas and Eastern Europe.

Accompanying musicians are brought in as the Grimes journey moves from place to place, be it pubs, village halls, theatres, cafés, festivals.

No place has been too small or too large to accommodate Carol Grimes, often bedecked with most striking hair-dos. Although her singing journey has been international, she’s always returned to London. And it’s in London where she’s been such a terrific influence on the lives of numerous putative jazz singers through her City Lit classes.

Now she’s still making a positive influence on the lives of people with Parkinson’s Disease, motor-neurone and other disabilities through her Sing for Joy groups in Kentish Town and Holborn.


Carol at St James Studio, February 2015

Carol Grimes, the 'Piaf' songstress of British music — this raw, in your face, sublime performer — takes you on a musical journey through her extraordinary life.

The Singer's Tale weaves its stories — sometimes shady, mad and bad — but with music and song at their heart.

“Carol Grimes has a fascinating story to tell. She also has a command of shaping and delivering words, a performance sense, and the musical and human depth and warmth to really make something of this. The story pulls in songs that reference times of her life. This project has such a strong heart, it really could go anywhere as it develops. Dorian Ford has no music, just her words in front of him. His ability to match mood or word with chord or line, to evoke the ghosts of songs past is a revelation too.” (review by Sebastian Scotney)

Like Geoffrey Chaucer’s pilgrims in The Canterbury Tales, Carol’s journey started in London. As a singer, she is the character Chaucer left out from his Tales. From her first gig, Carol has attracted enthusiastic followers who want to join her on her “pilgrimage”.

He could songs make and well endite.” (from the prologue of The Canterbury Tales) — Chaucer didn’t write a Singer’s Tale, so here is mine.

Carol’s principal musician/performer in telling her tale is pianist Dorian Ford. Other first class musicians who regularly work with Carol are brought in along the road to add to the story wherever it lands: pubs, village halls, theatres, cafes, festivals – no place is too small or too large to embrace Carol Grimes and her Singer’s Tale.

9th and 26 February 2015. Doors open 7.15pm, show at 8pm.
St James Studio, 12 Palace Street, London SW1E 5JA. Nearest tube: Victoria.

Book on 0844 2642140 or at www.stjamestheatre.co.uk


Sing for Joy

Sing for Joy

Sing for Joy is a community choir for people with Parkinson's Disease and similar conditions, their friends and carers.

We are all sorts of ages, types and genders. All that we have in common is that we have an illness, or care for someone with an illness, and that singing with others makes us feel better.

To find our more about us, please click here.


All content Copyright © 2015 Carol Grimes.